Freshfield Grove

Tales of Tasmanian Adventures in Olive Oil


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Recipes From My Kitchen – Colourful Roast Veggie Pasta

Cooking veggies in extra virgin olive oil (EVOO) increases the antioxidant-rich phenols of the vegetables. Phenols are known to be anti-inflammatory and have a preventative effect against cancers and chronic illnesses. They’re present in vegetables and EVOO, but cooking them together by frying or baking increases their availability. Cooking veggies like this obviously increases the calories, but EVOO has been shown to keep us feeling full for longer after meals, so it reduces calories from snacking!

These veggies can all be grown in the area where I live in the Coal River Valley region of Tasmania, but my vegetable patch is still in its infancy! I’m lucky to be able to find many of them at local markets when they’re in season though.

This recipe takes a while because of the time for the veg to roast, but the chopping is the most difficult and time consuming part! I scale this up or down depending how many people I want to feed, Continue reading


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Pick Your Own Olives

We grow two varieties of olive in our grove in the Coal River Valley; Picual and Manzanillo. Both are Spanish varieties (which is why if you “Adopt An Olive Tree”, your tree will have a Spanish name!) They’re both happy in our cool climate, and they help to pollinate each other. Traditionally Picual is an oil variety, and Manzanillo is a table olive, but you can eat the Picuals, and press the Manzanillos. The Picual olives are smaller than the Manzanillos, and the two are slightly different shapes, with the Manzanillo being rounder – they look a bit like plump cherries when they turn black. (For more on green and black olives, read this previous post.) Manzanillos tend to have a higher moisture content too, which makes them harder to press into oil for technical reasons that I need to find out more about!

Can you spot the difference between Picual and Manzanillo from the photos below?

In the longer term, we’re planning to make table olives as part of our range of products, but at the moment we’re still getting on top of the extra virgin olive oil (EVOO) side of things. I’m going to pick some of our Manzanillos to do a few preserving experiments with, but there’ll be lots left on the trees. So, we’ve decided to offer “Pick Your Own Olives” days at our olive grove in Campania. Dates will be announced towards the end of May, when we have a better idea of when they’ll be ripe, but it’s likely to be in early June this year. This time of year is always exciting in Tasmania, because the Dark Mofo winter festival is on around then, so there’s tons going on.

I’ll be writing more on how to cure olives in some following posts, but the basic principle is that the bitterness needs to be removed. I don’t know if you’ve ever tried biting into an olive straight off the tree, but it’s not a pleasant experience! This can be done using water-curing, brine-curing, or lye-curing (=caustic soda – yuk! Which is how most commercially available olives are produced because it’s very quick.)

If you’d like to be first in line to find out when our “Pick Your Own Olives” days are on, then watch this space, or sign up to my mailing list and I’ll send you an invite so you don’t miss out!

CLICK HERE to sign up to my mailing list.


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Recipes From My Kitchen – Cauliflower Cheese Pasta Bake

This recipe is like a cross between cauliflower cheese and macaroni cheese, and it’s perfect comfort food! The weather’s picked up again in Tassie and we’ve got some beautiful sunny days as we head into autumn, but it was getting a bit chilly for a while and I dug this recipe out! Make this to enjoy on its own, or pair it with some BBQ food. It’s great as a veggie dish, but chicken or bacon are tasty additions. I sometimes add a bit of broccoli too, for a little more colour. It can also be prepared in advance, Continue reading


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Newsletter – February 2017

Click here to read the February 2017 Newsletter, with news of my adventures in and out of the grove…


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Recipes From My Kitchen – Spaghetti with Beans, Walnuts, and Mascarpone

I created this dish as a way to use some of the beans that are currently cropping really well in my new veggie patch. These borlotti beans (aka tongue of fire) are so pretty with their red streaky pods (although this colour disappears on cooking). I’ve picked these young and am eating them pods and all. Regular green beans, or French beans, would also work really well in this, but the ones I’m growing aren’t quite big enough yet!

I wanted to make a quick meal for dinner, and a rummage in the pantry and fridge revealed walnuts and mascarpone. I had a vague idea of what to do and found something similar without the beans in this great pasta sauce book by Dianne Seed (a fab gift from my Mum!) Mascarpone cheese can be frozen, so if you don’t use the whole tub, you can pop the rest in the freezer til next time.

Spaghetti with Beans, Walnuts, and Mascarpone

  • Servings: 2
  • Time: 20 minutes
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

Use this recipe combining fresh beans in a creamy pasta sauce with the lovely added texture of walnuts, to make a speedy light dinner for 2

Ingredients

  • 100g spaghetti
  • 4 tablespoons of extra virgin olive oil
  • a handful of beans, chopped
  • ½ teaspoon lemon zest
  • 1 clove of garlic, crushed
  • 4 tablespoons of chopped walnuts
  • 80g mascarpone cheese
  • 25g parmesan cheese, finely grated
  • Salt and pepper

Directions

  1. Cook the spaghetti in salted water, and while that’s happening…
  2. Pour the extra virgin olive oil into a frying pan over medium heat.
  3. Add the chopped beans, crushed garlic, and lemon zest, and cook for 5 minutes.
  4. Add the chopped walnuts and cook for a further 2 minutes.
  5. Remove from the heat, add the mascarpone and stir to combine.
  6. Return to the heat, add the grated parmesan, and season with salt and pepper to taste.
  7. Add a few tablespoons of the pasta cooking water to loosen the sauce a little (use boiling water from the kettle if you’ve already drained the pasta).
  8. Drain the pasta, tip it into the sauce, and combine to coat the pasta with the sauce.
  9. Serve and enjoy!

Possible substitutions and additions:
– A variety of different beans would work well here – French beans, young runner beans, double podded broad beans…
– I think double cream could be substituted for the mascarpone, and this would give a more decadent, creamy result.
– The parmesan could be increased to make it cheesier, or perhaps substituted for a blue cheese, in which case I’d omit the lemon and garlic.
– Spaghetti works well with this creamy sauce, but other pasta shapes would be just fine. Wholewheat pasta could be used to increase the fibre content.

Other tips:
– Make sure the walnuts you use are fresh – old rancid ones will ruin the dish. Fresh walnuts tend to have a paler colour, while old ones can be rather darker.
– You can freeze any leftover mascarpone cheese.


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Interview on Tasmania ABC Radio Drive Show

I was interviewed by the lovely Helen Shield for Tasmania’s ABC Radio Drivetime show, broadcast just before Christmas. It was a fun experience, if a bit scary! If you’ve got 7 minutes, have a listen and find out a bit more about what we’re doing at the moment, how we got here, and what the future may hold!

 

Want to get involved and be able to try our fabulous, fresh 2017 harvest oil later this year? Find out how to adopt one of our trees by clicking HERE.

Fiona and Glenn at Freshfield Grove, Campania, Tasmania


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Adopt an Olive Tree

I’ve been working on this for a little while, and I’m excited to announce this new way for more people to get involved with our adventures. We’ve decided to put our trees up for adoption!

Each of our trees is unique, and so they each have their own name – Spanish of course since Picual and Manzanillo are both Spanish varieties!

We’ve got three different packages to suit every budget, and they would all make an amazing gift for food lovers 🙂

The packages include:

  • An emailed adoption certificate that you can print straight away (fab as a gift if you’ve left it ‘til the last minute!)
  • A digital photo of your tree, with his or her name.
  • A map image and a Google Earth placemark showing YOUR tree’s exact location in our grove, so you can really get a feel for where your tree lives.
  • A printed adoption certificate including a photograph of YOUR tree, sent by post.
  • We would love you to visit your tree here in Tasmania, and we’d be delighted to give you a tour of the grove on selected Fridays and Saturdays throughout the year. Just get in touch to let us know when you’d like to come.
  • Delivery of our next harvest of Extra Virgin Olive Oil delivered to your door!

All the details are on our special “Adopt a Tasmanian Olive Tree” website – click here to take a look.